We’ve known for some time that former NFL star Herschel Walker was going to fight on Strikeforce’s final event of the year in St.Louis on December 4th, but until now his opponent remained a mystery.

Following his debut victory back in January over Greg Nagy, a 27 year old with a record of 1-1 at the time,Walker himself insisted that next time out he wanted a tougher challenge.

“One thing I want to do is step up a little bit. I want to thank Greg [Nagy] for giving me the opportunity to fight. My next fight which I want to step up a little bit more,” he stated after securing a unanimous decision win.

The promotion have now revealed that the man they believe fits that description is Scott Carson who will now face the 47 year old on the main card of the December event.

On the surface this may seems like a decent enough challenge when you consider that Carson is a former WEC fighter with a record of 4-1. When you look a little deeper though It seems that Strikeforce are once again attempting to pull the wool over our eyes.

For instance Carson is 40 years old, he fought at the WEC’s first ever event in 2001 and then had a nine year(!) break before staging a comeback in June of this year in which he picked up his first and only loss by first round KO.

On reflection I’d question whether this really meets Walker’s expectations of a step-up in competition, and really what the point of this fight is.  Ok, I get that Walker is a ratings winner, but if he loses to a no-mark like this then, not the first time (need I mention Bobby Lashley?), Strikeforce will end up looking foolish.

Herschel has already admitted he won’t be a contender in the 205lb weight-class and he’s not getting any younger, so why not at least bring in an up and coming young talent or even someone from the Strikeforce Challengers series to fight him instead.  That way if he wins there’s some credibility attached to it, and if he loses then the promotion can use the fight to boost his opponent’s profile.

Instead we’re left with a freak show fight on a high profile show while other talented fighters on the Strikeforce roster miss out on a chance to make a name for themselves.

Is it really worth it for a 100,000 extra viewers and a few extra media spots?  Seems like a short-sighted strategy to me.