Patrick ‘HD’ Barry is one of the sports good guys. He doesn’t himself too seriously, he’s always seems to have time to talk, whether it’s with the media or with fans, and he tells some of the funniest stories you could hope to hear.

The trouble is that, by his own admission, he struggles to switch of the nice guy image once he steps into the cage.

“I’m not a bloodthirsty animal,” he confesses to “I’ve hit guys, and this is bad for me, but I’ve hit some guys with some real stiff shots and not followed it up. Like — boom — then kind of like look at them to see if they’re OK. Not OK, but if they’re dazed enough that the ref would stop the fight, versus some guy being unconscious, and, while he’s unconscious, me hit him six more times before the ref gets to him.

“That’s also bad because I’ve had guys in really bad situations where if I was to just bump into them a little, I’d finish the fight, and guys have gone from dazed to woken up. If you remember the Tim Hague fight [at UFC 98], when he stumbled back, he was out. He was like dazed. All I had to do was just touch him, but instead I backed up and looked at him. So by the time I got back to him, he was back awake again.”

Continuing with his candid assessment of his attitude, he reveals that despite earning his living in what announcer Bruce Buffer terms as, “the ultimate proving ground for fighters,” he’s never possessed the killer instinct.

“I don’t hate anybody I fight. I’m not angry at anyone that I compete against. I need them just as much as they need me. We have to feed off of each other. If we don’t have fighters out there, then I don’t work.

“I think that there’s a classy way, and I get a lot of flack about this, there’s a classy way to be a good sportsman versus just being a brute. I’ve never been in a street fight, man. I’m about to be 31. I’ve never been in a street fight, not even at recess in fourth grade, never. Of course everybody in the world gets mad at somebody eventually, but I’m not a fighter. I play the game really well, but I’m not an angry dude at all.”

He does indeed play the game really well.  Despite his frank admissions it’s worth remembering that in his first two professional kickboxing bouts, dating back to 2002-2003, he won by KO.  In his fledgling MMA career he won his first four bouts by either TKO or KO inside the first round.

With that kind of track record I’d hate to see what he’d do if he did get angry at one of his opponents!