Pat Barry had the opportunity to headline a big event last night at UFC On Versus 4, and came within seconds of finishing Cheick Kongo before falling victim to one of the biggest out-of-the-blue knockout’s in the history of the promotion.

Later Barry reflected on the fight, and in particular the first ever knockout loss of his combat sports career.

“It’s been alright I guess, nothing too horrible,” Barry told backstage after the fight while munching on a slice of pizza. “I’ve never been knocked out before so this is just a weird feeling man. I mean, to me, to loose two minutes of your life…honestly when I was laying flat on my back I opened my eyes and [my coach] Matty Morgan was standing over me, the first thing that came out of my mouth was, ‘Yo man, I killed him.’

“So I thought I had won the fight. I don’t remember nothing man. I remember the entire fight up until I got punched. Don’t remember going out, and when I woke up I thought the fight was over and I was the winner. I thought I was still standing up as a matter of fact. I was kind of shocked when I sat up off the ground.”

Barry remembers enough about the fight to know just how close he came to stopping Kongo, and he recalls a moment when he believed the referee was about to swoop in to save the Frenchman from further punishment.

“There was a point in time with the second knockdown where [referee] Dan Miragliotta kind of stumbled across me where I thought he was trying to pull me off of him, or something, like I was pretty sure the fight was done, but he hadn’t stopped it so I was going to keep hitting him until they either dove on me or took a tazer out and shot me. I had him pretty rocked and all of a sudden I was laying on my back.”

The heavyweight fighter doesn’t hold a grudge against Miragliotta for not stopping it sooner however, and in fact praises him for his judgement call.

“Cheick Kongo was still moving. He may have been dazed or out of it, or didn’t know where he was, but he was still reaching forward for my leg. He wasn’t just laying there like a dead body, so no, I don’t have any gripes towards [Miragliotta].”

Though the defeat must be hard to take, Barry appears to be taking it well and remains philosophical about how it turned out.

“If I had to have gone back in time I wouldn’t have done anything different. The fight was exactly the way it was supposed to be. I don’t think anyone can say I showed too much respect. If anything I was overly aggressive, and maybe that was the downfall.”

See Barry’s full interview below.


  1. This was a great fight imo the ref should have called it but also this fight shows more promise for Barry than anything did you see how easily kongo got wobbled? Kongo didnt look impressive at all props for the ko punch Though and Barry goodluck on your carreer you have lots of potential

  2. It was good to see Barry showing that he’s got power in his hands as well as his kicks.

    Kongo’s is maybe a bit chinny – the first knockdown reminded me of when Frank Mir floored him in similiar fashion – but the speed of his recovery and his raw survival instincts is very impressive.

  3. Pat Barry is a better striker than Kongo, but Kongo being one of the most precise and hardest hitters and having one of the best chins, there were safer ways to go for the finish. I think if Barry were more experienced, he would have listened to that gut instinct to go for the gulliotine@ 2:41 and 2:31, not tee-ing off with minimal space sandwiched between Kongo and the cage. But seriously, very little he could have done. Pat had great takedown defense pushing the head down. Kongo is just a bit of a freak. He was rocked HARD, and he was on semi-conscious auto-pilot. Amazing how he still has striking precision and such power, and the instincts to throw a hook then uppercut while being semi-aware.

    Also if Pat had tremendous cardio, he could have came in to try to wear Kongo out, or gradually increased the aggression. The adrenaline and the fight being fresh helped in Kongo’s comeback.